General Education Course Descriptions

ACADEMIC TRAVEL ABROAD (ATA)

ATA designated trips are scheduled between semesters as described below.

April – May ATA

Offered between spring and summer semesters, this two-week immersion experience is the keystone of several General Education courses – students will enroll for one or multiple courses below to meet ATA travel requirements.

  • HU 215 (Health Care Core course) for 3 semester hours
  • HC 280 for 1 - 2 semester hours   
  • HU 290 for 1 - 3 semester hours
  • HU 291 for zero semester hours.

HU 215 Academic Travel Abroad Humanities

Three semester hours
This Academic Travel Abroad course satisfies the Health Care Core - Humanities requirement. A 12-day travel experience serves as the keystone of this hybrid courses, which consists of pre-trip preparations and post-trip assignments. It offers a student-centered, first-hand look at the history, arts, and cultural identity of the country or countries on the itinerary. It also traces the history of healing in that country, including a visit to a hospital or clinic for students to interact with providers, educators, and students from another system.

HC 280 International Health Care

One to two semester hours
This course examines health care systems in other countries and compares them to the American health care system. Students will participate in international visits to hospitals and other historical health care sites in the country visited by students participating in the Academic Travel Abroad program.

HU 290 Special Topics in Humanities

One to three semester hours
Taken through Academic Travel Abroad, this course provides a first-hand introduction to the historical and artistic identity shaped by a Western (but non-American) culture. Foci may include the history (people, places, ideas, events) and the arts (architecture, sculpture, literature, painting) that reflect a unique cultural identity. This ATA course may be taken in conjunction with HU 215 and/or HC 280, can be used as an elective, and may be repeated as different cultures are visited and studied.

HU 291 Special Topics in Humanities

No semester hours assigned
Taken through Academic Travel Abroad, this course provides a first-hand introduction to the historical and artistic identity shaped by a Western (but non-American) culture. Foci may include the history (people, places, ideas, events) and the arts (architecture, sculpture, literature, painting) that reflect a unique cultural identity. This ATA course is intended for students who do not need additional elective credit but wish to benefit from the opportunity to travel abroad. The course may be repeated as different cultures are visited and is graded Pass / No pass.

December ATA

Clarkson College offers a collaborative academic travel experience in which students from Clarkson College, Nebraska Methodist College, and Bryan College of Health Sciences have the opportunity to experience cultural diversity, an international view of health care, and travel together, as well as, learn together in either the ATA 270 or ATA 271 courses. These trips are scheduled between the fall and spring semesters.

ATA 270 Special Topics in ATA

This course is a team-taught variable credit course that satisfies one to three hours of General Education elective credit. It offers a first-hand introduction to the history, arts and health care systems of other cultures, including at least one hospital tour for students to interact with providers and educators from another system. The course may include more than one culture and may be repeated as different cultures are visited.

ATA 271 Special Topics in ATA

This course is a team-taught course intended for students who do not need elective credit but wish to benefit from the opportunity to travel abroad. It offers a first-hand introduction to the history, arts and health care systems of other cultures, including at least one hospital tour for students to interact with providers and educators from another system. The course may be repeated as different cultures are visited and is graded Pass / No pass.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

BI 122 Nutrition Science

Three semester hours
This course provides an introduction to basic nutrition information. Cultural differences in food behaviors are discussed in relationship to healthy dietary habits. The course furthers the study of nutrition as students are guided through the concepts of medical nutrition therapy (MNT). Medical nutrition therapy involves specific diseases or conditions requiring modifications of the nutritional components of the normal diet. Each modified diet has a purpose or rationale and its use is usually determined by the physician and/or dietitian.

BI 210 Microbiology (lecture and lab)

Four semester hours
Microbiology is a course designed to introduce students to microbial structure, classification and identification. The characteristics of bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoan diseases will be examined. The impact of microbiology on health care professions will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: CH 110 and BI 211 are required for undergraduate nursing majors.

BI 210.RS Microbiology Recitation

Non-credit course
Microbiology recitation meets for one hour each week to reinforce the concepts and knowledge discussed in the lecture course. Topics such as study skills, reading, note-taking, time management, and test-taking strategies are explored in conjunction with course content. Recitation also provides students an opportunity to ask questions and practice new skills in a small group environment.
Co-requisite:  BI 210 lecture and lab

Enrollment requirements: Students with Conditional Admission Status and/or students below the Pre-Advisement Assessment Exam benchmark score.
Note: Students may enroll with Advisor and/or Faculty recommendation.

BI 211 Anatomy (lecture and lab)

Four semester hours
Students will gain important concepts about human anatomy in preparation for their degree program coursework. Because knowledge of the human anatomy is essential in understanding and practicing methods used in their skill, anatomy will provide students anatomical foundation they will need to become successful as a student and a future practitioner.

BI 211.RS Anatomy Recitation

Non-credit course
Anatomy recitation meets for one hour each week to reinforce the concepts and knowledge discussed in the lecture course. Topics such as study skills, reading, note-taking, time management, and test-taking strategies are explored in conjunction with course content. Recitation also provides students an opportunity to ask questions and practice new skills in a small group environment.
Co-requisite:  BI 211 lecture and lab

Enrollment requirements:Students with Conditional Admission Status and/or students below the Pre-Advisement Assessment Exam benchmark score.
Note: Students may enroll with Advisor and/or Faculty recommendation.

BI 213 Physiology (lecture and lab)

Four semester hours
Physiology is a rigorous course designed for students pursuing health care careers. This course will provide a foundation of basic principles necessary for pathophysiology and pharmacology, as well as the study of related health care subjects. Emphasis is placed on relating anatomy to physiology, system connections, homeostatic mechanisms and clinical applications that will impact future patients. Instructional activities in lecture and lab are integrated to facilitate the application of basic principles and critical thinking to the health care field.
Prerequisites: BI 211. CH 110 and BI 211 are required for undergraduate nursing majors.

BI 213.RS Physiology Recitation

Non-credit course
Physiology recitation meets for one hour each week to reinforce the concepts and knowledge discussed in the lecture course. Topics such as study skills, reading, note-taking, time management, and test-taking strategies are explored in conjunction with course content. Recitation also provides students an opportunity to ask questions and practice new skills in a small group environment.
Co-requisite:  BI 213 lecture and lab

Enrollment requirements: Students with Conditional Admission Status and/or students below the Pre-Advisement Assessment Exam benchmark score.
Note: Students may enroll with Advisor and/or Faculty recommendation.

BI 227 Pathophysiology

Three semester hours
Human physiological responses to disease, stress and the environment are studied; and pathophysiological processes are analyzed to provide the scientific rationale for nursing interventions. Diagnostic and medical treatment modalities are studied in conjunction with pathological dynamics.
Prerequisites: CH 110, BI 210, BI 211 and BI 213.

BI 290 Special Topics in Biology

One to three semester hours
This course focuses on topics of interest in specific areas of study selected by Clarkson College. The course may be repeated as different topics are offered.

BI 312 Cadaver Applications in Anatomy (lecture and lab)

Four semester hours
Students will build on their basic anatomy knowledge through detailed cadaver dissection and lecture. This course will add depth and detail regarding anatomical structures and systems through correlation of regional anatomy to clinical cases.
Prerequisite: BI 211 or equivalent.

BI 806 Cadaver Applications in Anatomy (lecture and lab)

Four semester hours
Students will build on their undergraduate and clinical experiences through detailed cadaver dissection and lecture. Correlation of pertinent regional anatomy to clinical cases and/or areas of graduate study will be emphasized when relevant.
Prerequisite: BI 211 or equivalent.

CHEMISTRY

CH 110 General Chemistry I (lecture and lab)

Four semester hours
This course provides an introduction to the topics of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. Topics include: atomic structure and bonding; chemical reactions; nomenclature; gases; solutions; acids; bases and buffers; the function and structure of carbohydrates; lipids; proteins and nucleic acids; metabolic pathways and energy production. Emphasis will be placed on topics that relate to health care professions.
Prerequisite: MA 101 may be taken concurrently or prior to CH 110.

CH 110.RS General Chemistry Recitation

Non-credit course
Chemistry recitation meets for one hour each week to reinforce the concepts and knowledge discussed in the lecture course. Topics such as study skills, reading, note-taking, time management, and test-taking strategies are explored in conjunction with course content. Recitation also provides students an opportunity to ask questions and practice new skills in a small group environment.
Co-requisite:  CH 110 lecture and lab

Enrollment requirements:Students with Conditional Admission Status and/or students below the Pre-Advisement Assessment Exam benchmark score.
Note: Students may enroll with Advisor and/or Faculty recommendation.

COMMUNICATION

CA 110 Introduction to Sign Language for Communicating with the Hearing Impaired

Three semester hours
An overview of the Beginning Signing Exact English including the development of Signing Exact English (SEE II), the history of deaf education and the strategies employed for developing expressive and receptive skills to enhance manual conversation.

CA 111 Introduction to Sign Language for Communicating with the Hearing Impaired II

Three semester hours
Continuation of CA 110, with emphasis on signing practice and refinement.
Prerequisite: CA 110 or permission of instructor.

ENGLISH AND LITERATURE

EN 101 English Composition I

Three semester hours
This introduction to college-level writing proposes to develop individual style and voice in papers that are fully developed, well organized and grammatically accurate. This process includes invention, outline, drafting, peer review, revision and editing. Expository methods may include the abstract, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, problem solution and literary interpretation. The best writers focus on topics important to them. Therefore, within certain parameters, the student will choose the topic and point of view of each writing assignment.

EN 102 English Composition II

Three semester hours
English Composition II provides advanced instruction and practice in the art of writing. This course builds on Composition I by surpassing expository writing and focusing instead on metacognitive analysis and research integration, via analysis of nonfiction and rhetoric-based texts.
Prerequisite: EN 101 or equivalent.

EN 202 Writing Advancement

One semester hour
This writing course emphasizes individual attention and small group activity for advancement of student writing. The focus will be on writing skills that usually need the most help: initial drafting, synthesis of ideas, revising for professionalism and American Psychological Association (APA) style. Activities that advance these skills are paired with technological writing techniques in order to advance writing and keep it competitive within the healthcare arena.
Course Grade: Pass/No Pass
Prerequisites:
EN 101 and EN 102 or the equivalent.

GENERAL

GEN 101 Strategies for Success

One semester hour
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the foundations for academic success. Topics will include; wellness, information literacy, time management, note-taking, test-taking, reading and listening skills, decision making, professionalism, money management, and resiliency.
Course Grade: Pass/No Pass

Undergraduate students who meet one of the following criteria will be required to enroll in GEN 101:

  1. Students with New Student Experience status
  2. Students with Conditional Admission Status
  3. Students with a recommendation from their Academic Advisor.

Note: Students in on-campus programs must register for an on-campus section of the course.

GEN 105 Medical Terminology

One semester hour
(One hour theory per week) This online course introduces the students to medical terminology utilizing word-building methodologies. The students will study various root words, prefixes, suffixes and connectors and develop their skills of analyzing, synthesizing, writing and communicating terminology pertinent to all health science-related disciplines.

HEALTH CARE

HC 200 Health Care Sciences Update I

Three semester hours
This course provides a review of the structural and functional relationships of the human body. Key elements of biochemistry and cell biology will be refreshed before the review of organ systems. Special emphasis will be placed on neuroanatomy and physiology, cardiac and vascular physiology and renal physiology. Finally, the function of the immune system components during its protection of the body from pathogenic microorganisms and cancer, during hypersensitivities autoimmune diseases and during transplant rejection will be discussed.
Prerequisite: Admission into RN to BSN program.

HC 205 Health Care Sciences Update II

Three semester hours
Current knowledge and insights in pathophysiological processes are analyzed to provide the scientific rationale for pharmacological advances used in today’s health care environment.
Prerequisite: Admission into RN to BSN program.

HC 210 Health Care Sciences Update III

Three semester hours
This course provides a review of the basic principles of microbiology and biochemistry. The student’s basic biochemistry knowledge will be expanded to include: stereochemistry, biomolecular chemistry, enzymology, PH influences, bioenergetics, metabolism, biosynthesis, amino and nucleic acids, lipids, proteins, genetic coding and pathways in cellular metabolism. The student’s basic microbiology knowledge will be expanded to include the structure, function and characteristics of bacteria, viruses, fungus and protozoa.
Prerequisite: Admission into RN to BSN program.

HC 220 Gerontology

Two semester hours
This course is an introduction to the field of human aging. The course of study will include a multidisciplinary examination of the way in which human aging is viewed, how we perceive the process of growing older and how society responds to the issues and problems of aging. The class will look at aging from the perspective of the social and political sciences, biological sciences, arts and humanities, care-giving and independent living, especially with the advent of the Baby Boomers in mind. 

HEALTH CARE CORE

EA 200 Health Care Ethics

Three semester hours
This course introduces the frameworks and concepts useful to approaching, understanding, and resolving ethical issues. Students will use sociological and historical approaches to understand modern ethical dilemmas in health care. Analysis of these issues will go beyond the individual to include the family, organization, and community.

EA 205 Death and Dying

Three semester hours
This course promotes an increased understanding of topics related to dying, death and bereavement.  The goal is to increase knowledge and confidence when interacting with patients, families, and support systems at the end of life. Emphasis is placed on practical interventions and building empathy during this unique time in the lifespan.  This course includes tours of a local funeral home and cemetery

EA 210  American Poverty and Health Care

Three semester hours
Health and income are strongly correlated in America. People living in poverty suffer from more chronic and acute diseases, experience higher rates of mental illness, and die earlier. This course seeks to answer three questions. Why are people poor? How does poverty lead to health disparities? What can a health care professional do about it?  This course will examine historical approaches to solving poverty, current policies, and future directions.  Students will consider the influence of factors including race, gender, culture, education, location, power, politics, and markets.

EA 215  Abnormal Psychology

Three semester hours
This course will serve as a patient-focused examination of abnormal psychology by introducing the DSM-5, as well as contemporary research and theory in the broad field of psychopathology. We will examine the history, causes, consequences, and treatments of abnormal behavior.  As healthcare professionals, we must recognize that normal and abnormal behaviors are usually the result of both physiological and psychological factors, and acquire an understanding of the neuroscience, medical, mental health, and pragmatic implications of these disorders

HU 200  A Cultural History of the Healing Arts

Three semester hours
A Cultural History of the Healing Arts positions the history of health care within a cultural framework. The course reviews the social, intellectual and cultural history of the healing arts from ancient times to the 21st century. Not limited to the Western tradition, this approach invites the student to identify and explore the people, practices, and beliefs that have shaped the healing professions.

HU 205  The History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Three semester hours
In this course, students will explore the distinct yet increasingly overlapping histories of science, technology, and medicine from prehistory to the present. Moving from stone choppers in prehistory, through the emergence of natural philosophy in Ancient Greece, and the x-ray in the modern era, students will understand how our modern tools and understanding of the world have been influenced by practical need, careful observation, and rigorous research. The course will also highlight the cultural and sociological influences on the development of science, technology, and medicine.

HU 210  American Social Movements

Three semester hours
America has a rich history of social movements including American independence, abolition, states’ rights, civil rights, women’s rights, labor rights, environmentalism, religious freedom, and peace. This course will focus on the four major reform eras in history: antebellum America; the Progressive Era; the New Deal; and the 1960s. These moments are when Americans formed their national identity and decided the meaning of “America.”  We will address, to a greater or lesser extent, all of the major social movements in Americans’ past, exploring the ideas and actions of both those who sought change and those who opposed it.

HU 215  Academic Travel Abroad Humanities

Three semester hours
This Academic Travel Abroad course satisfies the Health Care Core – Humanities requirement. A 12-day travel experience serves as the keystone of this hybrid course, which consists of pre-trip preparations and post-trip assignments. It offers a student-centered, first-hand look at the history, arts, and cultural identity of the country or countries on the itinerary.  It also traces the history of healing in that country, including a visit to a hospital or clinic for students to interact with providers, educators, and students from another system.

 IC 200  Developing Cultural Competence

Three semester hours
This course serves students who are relatively new to the health care field or those with limited professional experience interacting with others of different racial, ethnic, linguistic or religious backgrounds. IC 200 introduces patient interactions, focusing on patient-centered techniques and building professional cultural competence. This course seeks to increase student self-assessment and reflection, considering ongoing professional growth. Course focus is on holistic patient assessment, identifying the influencing factors in patient health, illness, and treatment. This is a designated service course.

 IC 250  Advancing Cultural Competence

Three semester hours
This course serves students with experience in the health care field or those with professional experience interacting with others of different racial, ethnic, linguistic and religious backgrounds. IC 250 provides opportunities for students to build upon their previous experiences in order to advance their cultural competence when caring for patients of diverse backgrounds. Course focus is on holistic patient assessment with an emphasis on analyzing and incorporating culturally appropriate and patient-specific interventions and adjustments. This is a designated service course.

HEALTH CARE SERVICES

The Bachelor of Science degree in Health Care Services courses are also available as General Education electives.

MATHEMATICS

MA 101 Introduction to Algebra

Three semester hours
Basic concepts of the real number system, polynomials, first-degree equations, algebraic fractions, radicals and quadratic functions.

MA 120 College Algebra

Three semester hours
Covers axioms of real and complex numbers; equations and inequalities in a variable and solutions of these systems; polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/ACTIVITY

PE 210 Promotion of Healthy Living

Three semester hours
An overview of the promotion of healthy living, including the determinants of healthy behavior, the models and theories that provide a framework for predicting healthy behavior, and the strategies employed to bring about behavioral changes for health and disease prevention.

PE 291 Self Defense

Two semester hours
Self-defense is a state of mind as well as a set of physical skills. In this course you will learn self- defense techniques and develop the self-confidence and control needed to execute them properly with an appreciation for the individual’s physical abilities. This course will also help to broaden your base of knowledge of violence against women, teens, and safety measures for you and your family.

PSYCHOLOGY

PY 101 Introduction to Psychology

Three semester hours
Introduction to psychology is a course designed to acquaint students with the history, development and present status of the science of psychology. Students will be exposed to areas of behavior, cognition and learning; and special emphasis will be placed on the study of abnormal psychology and its impact on health care.

PY 200 Human Development

Three semester hours
A comprehensive exploration of the physical, psychosocial, cognitive and emotional development of individuals across their life span including the effect of culture on growth.

PY 220  Death and Dying: Perspectives for Health Care Providers

Two semester hours
This course promotes an increased understanding of topics related to dying, death and bereavement. The goal is to increase knowledge and confidence when interacting with patients, families, and support systems at the end of life. Emphasis is placed on practical interventions and building empathy during this unique time in the lifespan. This course includes tours of a local funeral home and cemetery.

SOCIOLOGY

SO 101 Introduction to Sociology

Three semester hours
Overview of the principles and methods of human behavior in groups. Includes group dynamics, cultural variation and social change.

SO 220 Medical Sociology

Two semester hours
This course introduces students to some of the main topics of medical sociology: the social construction of health and illness; inequalities in the distribution of illness and health care; the organization of health care work; the medical profession and the health care system. Students will learn about such topics as who gets sick and why; how health professions have evolved in the United States and how the health care landscape has been divided among professions; why individuals in medical occupations typically have more authority and receive higher incomes in the U.S. than elsewhere; what the relationship is between hospitals and other health care organizations and how that relationship has changed over time.
Note: SO 101 or equivalent is recommended before registration for SO 220.

SPANISH

SP 103 Spanish for the Health Care Provider-Introduction

Three semester hours
In this introductory course, students will be exposed to the basic Spanish language principles and learn practical vocabulary and insights into Hispanic cultural views on health care aimed at providing a foundation for basic conversation with Hispanic patients and family members.

SP 104 Spanish for the Health Care Provider-Conversation

Three semester hours
This course is designed to provide students with intense conversation practice and advanced vocabulary for medical personnel to improve fluency and ease of expression in successfully managing interactions with Spanish-speaking individuals.
Prerequisite: SP 103.

STATISTICS

ST 310 Statistics

Three semester hours
Introduction to the fundamental principles of statistics, including the ability to describe a data set and interpret what the description of the sample says about the population as a whole. An examination of the relationship between probability, chance events and statistical tools will lead to an appreciation of the importance of statistics, both in research and in the real world.

ST 410 Advanced Statistics for Public Health Care

Three semester hours
Advanced Statistics will provide an introduction to statistical experimentation and research methods with applications to health sciences. Concepts of estimation and inferences will be covered. Systematic coverage of the more widely used statistical methods, including simple and multiple regression, single factor and multifactor analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, goodness of fit tests, contingency tables, nonparametric procedures, and power of tests. Students are expected to complete a data-based project as part of the course requirement.
Prerequisite: ST 310 or equivalent